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Highlighting the World Wars I & II Memorabilia Collection of Dave Sleeper

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Jacksics, Paul R.


Rank: Private First Class
Serial Number: 31118819
Military Branch: Co. A, 63rd Inf. Bn., 11th Armored Div.
Origin: Connecticut
Date of Death: 1944-12-31
Luxemboutg American Cemetery
Featured: No

Paul Jacksics was born November 17, 1917. He was the son  of Stephen and Anna Jacksics of Fairfield, Connecticut.  Military paperwork shows he had a brother, George. Ancestry shows other members of his household in 1940 included Helen, Joseph and Julia. Paul enlisted in Hartford, CT on May 2, 1942 and was killed in action near Rechrival, Belgium on December 31, 1944 during the Battle of the Bulge. He had been a member of A Company, 63rd Armored Infantry Battalion. He had been engaged with the enemy only 2 days when he was killed. He was one of the first of 614 killed in action 11th Armored personnel.

PFC Jacksics was first interred in a cemetery at Grand Failly, France. He was disinterred October 10, 1948 and permanently buried in the Luxemburg American Cemetery on February 22, 1949.

The 11th Armored Division (11 AD) was a division of the US Army in World War 2. It was activated on 15 August 1942 at Camo Polk, Louisanna and then transferred to Camp Barkley, Texas on 5 September 1943, the division participated, beginning 29 October 1943, in the California maneuvers and arrived at Camp Cooke California on 11 February 1944. The division staged at Camp Kilmer, New Jersey from 16 to 29 September 1944 until departing New Yok Port of Embarkation on 29 September 1944, arriving in England on 11 October 1944.

The 11 AD landed in France on 16 December 1944, crossed into Belgium on 29 December, and entered Germany on 5 March 1945. The 11th Armored Division was deactivated in August 1945.

PFC Jacksics group includes his officially small machine engraved slot brooch Purple Hear in its presentation box, a pin back 11th Armored Division DI, and a small photo of his grave marker in Luxemburg.